SAT Sentence Completion Practice Question 165: Answer and Explanation

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Question: 165

10. The anthropology professor hoped that his latest book would appeal to popular as well as to ------- readers, thereby earning him ------- in both realms.

A. general . . disdain
B. lay . . attention
C. academic . . anonymity
D. avid . . remuneration
E. scholarly . . acclaim

Correct Answer: E

Explanation:

Explanation for Correct Answer E :

Choice (E) is correct. "Scholarly" means learned or academic. "Acclaim" is praise or applause. If one were to insert this term into the text, the sentence would read "The anthropology professor hoped that his latest book would appeal to popular as well as to scholarly readers, thereby earning him acclaim in both realms." The phrases "as well as" and "both realms" indicate that the professor hoped his book would appeal to two separate groups of readers. It makes sense to say that the professor hoped to earn "acclaim," or praise, from both popular readers and "scholarly," or academic, readers.

Explanation for Incorrect Answer A :

Choice (A) is incorrect. "General," in this context, means not confined by specialization. "Disdain" is a feeling of contempt or scorn. If one were to insert these terms into the text, the sentence would read "The anthropology professor hoped that his latest book would appeal to popular as well as to general readers, thereby earning him disdain in both realms." The phrases "as well as" and "both realms" indicate that the professor hoped his book would appeal to two separate groups of readers. The term "general" does not make logical sense in this context because there is not a clear distinction between the terms "general" and "popular" as they refer to similar groups of people. Additionally, the anthropology professor wanted his book to appeal to readers, so it is illogical to suggest that the anthropology professor hoped to earn "disdain," or contempt.

Explanation for Incorrect Answer B :

Choice (B) is incorrect. "Lay" means not associated with a profession or any particular knowledge. "Attention" is observation or notice. If one were to insert these terms into the text, the sentence would read "The anthropology professor hoped that his latest book would appeal to popular as well as to lay readers, thereby earning him attention in both realms." The phrases "as well as" and "both realms" indicate that the professor hoped his book would appeal to two separate groups of readers. The term "lay" does not make logical sense in this context because the terms "lay" and "popular" both refer to readers from one group, the general public.

Explanation for Incorrect Answer C :

Choice (C) is incorrect. "Academic" means scholarly or related to higher learning. "Anonymity" is a state of being unknown or unidentified. If one were to insert these terms into the text, the sentence would read "The anthropology professor hoped that his latest book would appeal to popular as well as to academic readers, thereby earning him anonymity in both realms." The professor likely hoped his book would appeal to readers in both the "popular" realm and the "academic," or scholarly, realm, but it is illogical to suggest that the professor hoped to earn "anonymity." Anonymity, or a state of being unknown, is not usually described as something one earns, and there is no reason to believe that the professor would not want to be known for his work.

Explanation for Incorrect Answer D :

Choice (D) is incorrect. "Avid" means enthusiastic and vigorous. "Remuneration" is payment for a service. If one were to insert these terms into the text, the sentence would read "The anthropology professor hoped that his latest book would appeal to popular as well as to avid readers, thereby earning him remuneration in both realms." The phrases "as well as" and "both realms" indicate that the professor hoped his book would appeal to two separate groups of readers. The terms "avid" and "popular" do not necessarily describe separate groups. Popular readers, or readers from the general public, can also be "avid," or enthusiastic, readers.

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