New SAT Writing and Language Practice Test 26

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At approximately 2:00 A.M. on August 6, 1945, a modified American B-29 Superfortress bomber named the Enola Gay left the island of Tinian for Hiroshima, Japan. Piloted by Colonel Paul Tibbets, commanding officer of the 509th Composite Group, who named the bomber after his mother, [1] flew the four-engine plane followed by two observation planes carrying cameras and scientific instruments. One of seven aircraft making the trip to Hiroshima, only the Enola Gay carried a bomb nicknamed “Little Boy”—a bomb that was expected to [2] lay waste to almost everything within a 3 square-mile area of the city. Measuring over 10 feet long and almost 30 inches across, it weighed close to 5 tons and had the explosive force of 20,000 tons of TNT.

(#1)The Enola Gay’s weaponeer, Navy Captain Deak Parsons, was concerned about taking off with the bomb fully assembled and live. (#2) Some heavily loaded B-29s had crashed on takeoff from Tinian. (#3) If that happened to the Enola Gay, the bomb might explode and wipe out half the island. (#4) Thus, Parsons, assisted by Lt. Morris Jeppson, finished the assembly and armed the bomb after takeoff. (#5) Carrying an atomic bomb for the first time, the crew had to be careful. [3]

[4] Four hours into the flight, it was 6:00 A.M., and that was when the bomb was fully armed, and then Tibbets announced to the crew that the plane was carrying the world’s first atomic bomb. Close to 7:00 A.M., the Japanese radar net detected aircraft heading toward Japan, and an alert [5] is broadcasted throughout the Hiroshima area. Soon afterward, a weather plane circled over the city but found no sign of bombers. The citizenry of Hiroshima, [6] consequently, began their daily routine and thought the danger had passed. At 7:25, the Enola Gay approached Hiroshima at 26,000 feet. By 8:00, Japanese radar again detected B-29s heading toward the city. Although radio stations broadcast additional warnings for people to take shelter, [7] but many ignored it and continue as before to carry out business as usual. At 8:09, the crew of the Enola Gay could see the city appear below and received a message indicating that the weather was good over Hiroshima.

A T-shaped bridge at the junction of the Honkawa and Motoyasu rivers near downtown Hiroshima was the target. [8] The aircraft arrived over the target area at 8:15 A.M. Upon seeing the target in the bomb sight, Little Boy was dropped. It exploded, instantly killing 80,000 to 140,000 people and seriously injuring 100,000 more. The bomb exploded some 1,900 feet above the center of the city, over Shima Surgical Hospital, some 70 yards southeast of the Industrial Promotional Hall (now known as the Atomic Bomb Dome). Crew members of the aircraft saw a column of smoke rising fast, observed intense fires springing up, [9] and a mushroom cloud, which almost enveloped the observation planes, was noticed, too. The burst temperature, estimated to reach over a million degrees Celsius, ignited the surrounding air, forming a fireball some 840 feet in diameter. Eyewitnesses more than 5 miles away said [10] its brightness exceeded the sun’s ten times over. In less than one second, the fireball had expanded to 900 feet. The blast wave shattered windows for a distance of ten miles and was felt as far away as 37 miles. Over two-thirds of Hiroshima’s buildings were demolished. [11] Huge fires by the hundreds, ignited by the thermal pulse, produced a firestorm that incinerated everything within 4.4 miles of ground zero.

To the crew of the Enola Gay, Hiroshima had disappeared under a thick, churning foam of flames and smoke. The co-pilot, Captain Robert Lewis, commented, “My God, what have we done?”

1.

  • A. NO CHANGE
  • B. the four-engine plane was followed by
  • C. flew the four-engine plane. It was followed by
  • D. the four-engine plane and he was followed

2.

  • A. NO CHANGE
  • B. decompose
  • C. cripple
  • D. trash

3. Which choice describes the most effective placement in the paragraph of sentence #5, the paragraph’s topic sentence?

  • A. After sentence 2
  • B. After sentence 3
  • C. After sentence 4
  • D. None of the above; delete it

4.

  • A. NO CHANGE
  • B. Four hours after take-off at 6:00 A.M., the bomb was fully armed and Tibbets
  • C. At 6:00 A.M., four hours into the flight, and the bomb was fully armed and that was when Tibbets
  • D. By 6:00 A.M. the bomb was fully armed, and Tibbets

5.

  • A. NO CHANGE
  • B. was broadcast
  • C. has been broadcast
  • D. had been broadcasted

6.

  • A. NO CHANGE
  • B. in consequence, therefore, began its daily routine
  • C. therefore, began its daily routine
  • D. began their daily routine

7.

  • A. NO CHANGE
  • B. but many citizens ignored the warnings and continued to carry out their
  • C. many ignored them and continued to carry out their
  • D. many of them were ignored and they conducted

8. In the context, which choice is the best way to combine the two underlined sentences into one?

  • A. The aircraft arrived over the target area at 8:15 A.M., and upon seeing the target in the bomb sight, Little Boy was dropped.
  • B. Overhead at 8:15 A.M., the bridge was seen through in the aircraft’s bomb sight and Little Boy was dropped.
  • C. At 8:15 A.M., viewing the bridge through the aircraft’s bomb sight, Little Boy was dropped.
  • D. Arriving over the bridge and seeing the target in the bomb sight at 8:15 A.M., the crew dropped Little Boy.

9.

  • A. NO CHANGE
  • B. and noticed a mushroom cloud almost enveloping the observation planes
  • C. and along with a mushroom cloud which almost enveloped the observation planes was noticed
  • D. noticing, too, that the observation planes were being almost enveloped in a mushroom cloud

10.

  • A. NO CHANGE
  • B. the brightness exceeded the sun tenfold
  • C. it was over ten times more brighter than the sun
  • D. the brightness of it exceeded the sun ten times over

11.

  • A. NO CHANGE
  • B. Huge fires by the hundreds ignited by the thermal pulse produced a firestorm, it incinerated
  • C. Huge fires by the hundreds, ignited by the thermal pulse; and produced a firestorm that incinerated
  • D. Huge fires, by the hundreds, and ignited by the thermal pulse, produced a firestorm that incinerated